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Monday, 22 January 2018

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Emma Walsh

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  • in reply to: Chaoda #27392

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Rob Marstrand will be including an update on Chaoda in his next quarterly strategy report, which you will receive towards the end of the month.
    Kind regards
    Emma Walsh
    Bonner & Partners Family Office

    in reply to: Ideas for Members-Only Events #18198

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Thanks Jay, we’ll bear that in mind. We have the Rancho Santana event in January 2015, but maybe we could look at something in AZ the following year.
    I hope you, Rita and the girls are all well.
    Rgds
    Emma

    in reply to: Quality Timberland for Sale #18123

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Editor’s Note: All free listings are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Bonner & Partners Family Office reserves the right to disqualify any listings it deems unsuitable. The Member must be mentioned as the primary contact in the listing. Bonner & Partners Family Office does not endorse these organizations or their respective products, services and programs. In addition, Bonner & Partners Family Office shall not be responsible for any and all liability, including negligence, that may arise from a member’s use of the following advertisements. “Caveat Emptor” applies – let the buyer beware.

    in reply to: House for sale in Switzerland, CHF 5m #27109

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Editor’s Note: All free listings are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Bonner & Partners Family Office reserves the right to disqualify any listings it deems unsuitable. The Member must be mentioned as the primary contact in the listing. Bonner & Partners Family Office does not endorse these organizations or their respective products, services and programs. In addition, Bonner & Partners Family Office shall not be responsible for any and all liability, including negligence, that may arise from a member’s use of the following advertisements. “Caveat Emptor” applies – let the buyer beware.

    in reply to: Will’s Stansberry promotions…opinions?? #27084

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Reply from fellow Bonner & Partners member:
    I’ve been a member of Stansberry’s “Private Wealth Alliance” (which offers lifetime subscriptions to a number of their publications for a single fixed fee) for some time now. There’s no doubt about the quality of their research – it’s excellent and in my view, this subscription is worth it for the educational content alone, which is outstanding

    As I understand it, Stansberry & Associates is an associated company of Bill’s holding company, Agora Publications, though I don’t know the exact relationship. This explains the joint marketing, but it doesn’t concern me, as Stansberry’s research is all proprietary.

    As I see it, there are four major differences between these entities: First, Stansberry offers mostly US-focussed research. Their coverage of international markets is limited to a few US-listed ETFs that are seen more as speculations than as core holdings. Second, the sheer quantity of research from Stansberry’s portfolio of publications is amazing. My PWA membership gives me seven separate publications, plus a number of periodic special reports, so I have to be quite selective to make sense of it all. Third, Stansberry also offers a number of trading publications (to which I don’t subscribe), but which do, I believe, have a great track record of success in the options markets. I think it’s these to which Will’s promo refers. I don’t subscribe because I don’t want to be a trader. Fourth, it’s worth mentioning that Stansberry’s presentational style is quite different from that in Bonner & Partners. If you ever watch the BBC’s wildlife programmes, I would say that the difference in style between Stansberry & Bonner is the same as the difference between the wide-eyed, arm-waving enthusiasm of a Steve Irwin vs the silken-voiced commentary of a David Attenborough. Both are informative, both educational, but you get more of the wide-eyed, arm-waving long promotional videos from Steve Irwin. You do have the delete button, though.

    in reply to: Headed For Another Crash? #27076

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Reply from fellow Bonner & Partners member:
    In dick stoken’s Strategic Investment Timing he gives a way to get in and out of markets at major turning points. (Highly recommended book.) during Deflationary times (as now) it only takes a 15 month high in both short and long rates to torpedo the market. this occurred in July 2013.
    Using his methods I was able to sidestep ALL the tops from Sept 1987 until now.
    Would love to know if his rules work the same way in foreign markets. Incidentally he has different rules for Inflationary times and how to tell when to change plus a lot more–on commodities and gold. not the easiest to read but definitely worth the effort.

    in reply to: Singapore Banks #18086

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Reply from fellow Bonner & Partners member:
    I see that this subject has attracted quite a bit of interest, so I thought I’d add to the post I made above, now I have a little more experience of operating these accounts.

    First, to respond to the comment just above, I absolutely agree that you have to know what you’re going to use the account for before you even consider opening one. To me, a Singapore bank account is first of all, a “safe haven” into and out of which I can easily transfer funds. I’ve noted (economic historian) Russell Napier’s view, that Singapore is likely to be the last country on earth to introduce exchange controls. You can see why if you take a look at the Singapore Government’s explanation of its approach to government debt, (http://www.gov.sg/government/web/content/govsg/classic/factually/Factually-310812-IsitfiscallysustainableforSingaporetohavesuchahighlevelofdebt). This makes for a rather different narrative from what you might read about the reason for government debt in the Western economies…

    Thus, I feel that the cash component of my portfolio is probably safer in Singapore than in most other jurisdictions, so I aim for a target % of my investment cash to be held in Singapore and of that, another target % in SGD. DBS has been my preferred bank for doing that, as they offer a single, multi-currency account which can hold up to 13 currencies

    Second, regarding holdings of gold, Bill has earlier referred to BullionVault (www.bullionvault.com), who offer online trading and secure vaulting service for allocated gold. BV now also offer a vaulting service in Singapore, so by linking a BV Singapore vaulting service to a Singapore bank, you can add gold (or silver) to the assets you hold in Singapore.

    The only wrinkle I have come across so far (with DBS), is an odd one, to do with the name of the account holder. The Singapore banks are extremely fussy when it comes to compliance with Money-laundering regulations. They will only accept deposits from an account in exactly the same name. I have three names and DBS list all three spelt out in full on my statements. In another bank, my name is just listed with initials and the first time I wired funds from this other bank to my DBS account, the funds were returned by DBS, because in their view, the funds were not coming from an account in exactly the same name. Pernickety, you might say and you’d be right. In this case, I had to change the name of the account I hold with Interactive Brokers – putting my full names in, in place of initials, so as to be able to wire funds to DBS, so there are some disadvantages to internationalising your banking arrangements and one of them is increased admin. Just setting up all the interbank links to be able to wire funds from one bank to another is quite time-consuming, especially if you are unfamiliar with international banking protocols (though you do learn fast when it’s your money!). However, in my view, time spent hunched over a keyboard at the start makes for a better night’s sleep once the job is done.

    Hope this helps!

    in reply to: Singapore Banks #27069

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Reply from fellow Bonner & Partners member:

    I decided to open one or more bank accounts in Singapore recently. The starting point was Bloomberg’s ranking of the “world’s safest banks” (http://hereisthecity.com/2013/05/02/qatar-national-bank-tops-bloomberg-markets-magazines-annual-rank/) in which OCBC ranks no 2 and DBS and UOB rank 5 and 6 respectively.

    You’d need to check out their service offerings online first and after doing this,Ii ruled out OCBC (Best website but Too many darned fees for what I wanted to do with the account) and settled on the other two. You have to visit to open an account (unless you are prepared to place large sums with them to become a “premiere” or “private banking” customer). They do say that there’s no guarantee that you will be accepted as a customer, even if you do turn up at their door with cash in hand, though, so be warned!

    So far, the service has been good and telephone customer service has also been good. However, it’s early days, so I’ll need more time to answer your question properly

    in reply to: Silver Bullion Singapore #18079

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Reply from fellow Bonner & Partners member:

    UOB Bank offers another option to account holders. Aside from buying and selling physical gold at their head office branch, you can set up either a certificated gold holding account or a gold savings account with the bank. You need to visit the bank to do this (you can’t set it up online) and you’d have to rely on the good standing of the bank as counterparty and custodian. Also, I’m not sure whether the gold held in these forms is allocated or not. Not ideal, perhaps,but in favour of this idea is Bloomberg’s recently rating of UOB as the 5th safest bank in the world. From my recent experience of opening a bank account with them, they behave very cautiously indeed – more so than any other bank I’ve dealt with!

    in reply to: Silver Bullion Singapore #27060

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Reply from fellow Bonner & Partners member:
    Yes, I have personally been there, met the folks and would recommend. They are in the Cisco Serberus Center so there are other storage options available in the same building/complex/


    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Reply from fellow Bonner & Partners member:

    You may need to set up an offshore IRA first (assuming your current administrator will not allow offshore storage facility), then transfer the gold to the new IRA…Tax Free….and simply ship the coins to the new storage facility. It is much more difficult if you intend to store them in your own private safe without incurring a taxable event…

    in reply to: HOW DO WE FOOL A GOLD THIEF W/ A METAL DETECTOR? #27052

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Post from fellow Bonner & Partners member:

    Another option: You can bury it in the garden in a weatherproof container quite deep, then as you fill in the hole, put some scrap metal/rusty old tools into the hole, so as to make it look as though they had been abandoned or forgotten. If a thief with a metal detector finds these, he is likely to move on at that point

    in reply to: Raising unconventional kids #27022

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Response from Bonner & Partners member:
    Your comments and ideas are great. It is so nice to pick up ideas others have created. Thank you for sharing them.

    When our children were ready for preschool, we did something that horrified a number of our friends. (Sometimes one finds out who the true friends are in the oddest ways.) We are both working professionals and enjoy many different kinds of people. We enrolled our two little ones in a preschool in the back of an old Baptist church close to downtown. (Gasp!) The caretakers as well as the attendees were of a wide variety of races and socioeconomic groups. Our children would describe, for example, that Janice is the one with the peach skin and yellow hair. Joey has the really curly dark hair and brown skin and he always had to be at the front of the line. They learned some of the alphabet and songs and games and, most important, how to relate to one another. And when they were old enough to attend the “real” schools, everyone was a potential friend — unless they proved not to be one. Within three months each was caught up with children who had been in more formal programs for several years.

    I would like to bring up a gentle thought on paying a child for each A on their report card and deducting $10 for each other grade. My parents were quite wise and well ahead of their time when it came to child rearing, at least from my very prejudiced point of view. Both were Ivy League/Seven Sisters All Americans, but those facts were something we learned much later in life, not something that was flaunted. Without question our accomplishments were recognized and we were encouraged to think and speak our mind as soon as we could participate in family discussions at dinner each night. We were also asked about our opinions, which often made a good argument but rarely swayed a major decision. We also knew where the lines were that we would cross at our own peril. (Going inside a friend’s home to play without telling Mom!)

    My father, an engineer, was in management with a very large national firm, and was transferred sometimes as often as every 18 months. [ My mother, who had been working on the polio vaccine, left Merck to marry him.] I believe tall this moving while we were young was a good influence on my siblings and me (four girls close in age) because we quickly learned what was important and could be trusted in life, as opposed to those places, people, and things that were transient. I have great memories of classmates and neighbors from every place we lived, but it was our family and our bond along with faith that we depended on. The rest would come and go. These would be with us for a long time.

    Both parents attended private schools all the way through, but put us in public schools. They did, however, their due diligence in finding the best school districts in an area and always bought a house there, and we received fine educations.

    One time at a new school we learned something unheard of from our classmates. Their parents paid for A’s on their report cards. Thinking I would be rich, I took my card in to Dad the night I’d gotten mine. He looked at it, gave me a hug, and said, “Yes, you’ve got good genes, kid!” Then he laughed. He was taking credit for it! We were expected to do our best in whatever the situation, whether we were paid for it or not. So I think there is much thought to be given as to how and why we are paying our kids. And I do not believe there is only one right answer.

    One other example: One of our children has an extremely high emotional intelligence. S is both right and left brained, so he oes well in detail as well as creativity. Had we followed this practice of $10 for an A with him, we might have discouraged and maybe even hurt him psychologically. His sister brought the grades home. She would have been “rich”. He was interested in so many different things that he sometimes he had difficulties deciding what took precedence. These issues about priorities were discussed, but that was it. He blossomed in areas that were not even recognized in schools at his age. He put his first computer together with his dad when he was six. He won the State Science Competition as a sixth grader with a multimedia (computer included) program on the growth of the space program. At age 10, he asked for the manuals on C+ computer language for Christmas. And when he reached high school, the teachers learned quickly who to turn to for help when the computer system in their area went down. This young man had his career well set before him before leaving high school.

    On our way home from Kindergarten one day, E asked me if I knew I was not a normal mother! I laughed and said that yes, I was aware of that. Did she mind? Her answer, “Oh no, I love it!” Then I leaned over and told her that my mother had not been a normal mother either.

    Our daughter repeatedly complained as she grew older about the rules of the family, which were brightly posted in a number of places in the house. They included: Do Mom and or Dad know the answer to the following questions: Where are you going? Who are you….? Who are you meeting? What are you planning…? etc. These were followed by a reminder of arrival times home for each, then a statement at the bottom of the rules of the family.

    Since she was the oldest, E tested the waters first and found out right away that, true to our word, if she called to say she would not make it home in time, we were quite happy to pick her up. Somehow that never ended up happening. Two times like that and she was always home on time. She went to a small highly academic college in another state. On her first visit home, she verified that the family rules had saved her from some of the things her friends in college had gone through. She just did not realize we were trying to give her some boundaries for protection until she had more experience and wisdom.

    I think my point is well made. I was one of two identical twins – rare in those days. We looked very much alike for years. Thankfully, our parents treated us as two of the four girls, not dressing us alike once we cold pull out our own clothes, not “the twins” but all four “the girls”. We were compared enough at school. Each child is blessed with different gifts and they bloom at different rates.

    I truly believe money management should be taught at a young age, and our two, now young adults, are fiscally responsible. But they grew up with that model and those discussions at the dinner table just as I had. When they were in high school, VISA made cards available that were under parenteral control. The kids loved them. Their allowance was deposited on schedule, and it they wanted something that was beyond the means of one allowance, or more, they practiced delayed gratification. They could call up their balances on the computer and see where every exact penny was — whether in savings or otherwise. Having not had a need for the cards recently, I do not know if they are still available. But it was a great experience for all of us.

    The greatest wealth in our family was and is in love, and we all knew it. We were /are not rich, although two of my sisters are very well off now. But we believed our richness came from the legacy of love from our parents before anything else. And their expectation was that we do the same.

    Oh, and yes, my husband and I had trust funds for each child’s education so it would not become a problem later and so it would not be taxed at our rate. There was also a wedding trust although the name of that trust gave no hint as to its purpose! But it was a delightful surprise to my husband when the engagement was announced and he learned of this fund, too.

    May each of you enjoy the love and memories your families continue to make together as much as we do ours.

    in reply to: Internship Exchange #27017

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Agora has an internship program (with the possibility of free housing for the intern) in Baltimore. Our internships can be paid or unpaid/for school credit and the start and end time is flexible based on the needs of the manager and the intern’s schedule. Some of our star employees started out as interns. For more information, contact Agora’s recruiting manager Amanda Datson: adatson@agorapublishinggroup.com

    in reply to: Gold storage options outside Europe, US & Canada #27301

    Emma Walsh
    Keymaster

    Response from Bonner & Partners member: FYI: For new purchases, Hard Assets Alliance is easy for Americans to setup and heard they now have Singapore storage

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)